Alloy Wheel Refurbishment Windsor

Welcome to warfield wheels your professional alloy wheel refurbishers. Warfield Wheels have been refurbishing alloy wheels for over a decade and have over 30 years experience in alloy wheel repairs. Most Alloys can be refurbished to brand new again. To see how we do it visit our Alloy Wheel Refurbishment Process page or Contact Us for more information.

Alloy Wheel Repair Windsor

Repairing alloy wheels is one of the processes that we at warfield wheels pride ourselves on. With state of the art machinary and tools we gaurantee to bring your alloy wheels back to new again. Not only do we repair and refurbish the outside rim we also refurbish the inside of every alloy. For the more daring person who likes to stand out we offer a custom paint service for a funky finish.

Find Us

Warfield Wheels
Unit 12 Scotts Industrial Estate
RG12 8TD
07738 827 980

5 mins from junction 10 on the M4 behind the john nike ski slope and ice rink.

Fact About Windsor

New Windsor was a nationally significant town in the Middle Ages, certainly one of the fifty wealthiest towns in the country by 1332. Its prosperity came from its close association with the royal household. The repeated investment in the castle brought London merchants (goldsmiths, vintners, spicers and mercers) to the town and provided much employment for townsmen. The development of the castle under Edward III (1350–68), for example, was the largest secular building project in England of the Middle Ages, and many Windsor people worked in the castle on this building project. Henry III, a hundred years earlier, had spent more on Windsor Castle than on any other royal building project, save the rebuilding of Westminster Abbey. The Black Death in 1348, although reducing some towns' populations by up to 50%, seems to have had less of an impact in Windsor. Possibly 30% of the town's population died, but the building projects of Edward III brought many building workers to the town, possibly doubling the population: the Black Death, and the plagues that followed in 1361 – 72, were a 'boom' time for the local economy. New people came to the town from every part of the country, and from continental Europe, to benefit from royal expenditure at the castle. The poet Geoffrey Chaucer worked at Windsor Castle as 'Clerk of the Works' in 1391.